UPM increases the fair value of its forest assets in Finland and changes the accounting policy of forest renewal costs

UPM increases the IFRS fair value of its forest assets in Finland, mainly due to higher forest growth estimates. In addition, the company adjusts its long-term wood price estimates slightly. The impact of these changes on the fair value of forest assets is approximately EUR 320 million and will be reported as an item affecting comparability in Q4 2018 under Other operations. The updated forest growth model indicates higher forest growth volumes that are explained mainly by sustainable forest management. "UPM's own forests are strategic source for UPM's wood supply. Active, timely and sustainable forest management combined with high quality seedling material have increased UPM's own forests' growth significantly over the years. Increasing forest growth and carbon sequestration enable higher sustainable harvesting volumes from UPM's own forests now and in the future," says Sauli Brander, Senior Vice President, Wood Sourcing and Forestry Northern Europe. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

UPM Raflatac expands RafCycle® label liner recycling solution to North America

UPM Raflatac is pleased to announce its RafCycle® recycling solution has expanded to the United States and Canada. Now, brands in this region can give new life to their self-adhesive label waste that would otherwise be landfilled. Converter and printer Fort Dearborn Company as well as several brand owners are participating in the launch. UPM Raflatac collects the paper and PET liner waste from its RafCycle partners and recycles it into new materials, which provides numerous benefits to printers, packers, brand-owners, and, of course, the environment. Turning waste into a resource is a key concept in the circular economy and an important part of UPM Raflatac's approach to labeling a smarter future beyond fossils. Collaboration across the value chain is important to making the RafCycle program successful in delivering more sustainable packaging solutions. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Transport decarbonisation moves forward – UPM Biofuels welcomes new EU Renewable Energy Directive REDII

European institutions have agreed on the Renewable Energy Directive REDII for the 2020s after the European Council adopted the agreement made earlier this summer. UPM welcomes the agreement that will increase the use of renewable energy to 32% in 2030 and requires 14% bioenergy to be used in transport. All the EU member states are obliged to implement a binding advanced biofuel blending mandate starting 2022. UPM Biofuels is one of the front-runners in the advanced biofuels industry. The UPM Lappeenranta Biorefinery, the world's first to produce wood-based renewable diesel and naphtha on a commercial scale, has proven the potential as a significant producer of truly sustainable advanced biofuels. UPM BioVerno, which reduces greenhouse gas emissions by over 80% compared with fossil fuels, has found a solid marketplace. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Yes, live Christmas trees are fine. Yes, you must recycle them.

There was a long period when having a live Christmas tree was a big no-no, for reasons I can no longer remember. First, folks got upset about people buying trees instead of cutting their own. Then there was the controversy about people getting their own instead of cutting one. Actually, I think it had more to do with the disposal of the tree than anything else. There are a staggering 25 million to 30 million trees purchased every year in the U.S. Burning them in the chimney creates creosote problems. Landfill space is scarce and expensive. A live tree can stay in the house for about four weeks at most, then spend the next four centuries in the landfill. This is not a sustainable practice when you consider the number of trees involved. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Kimberly-Clark’s Commitment to Forest Conservation Recognized with a 2018 FSC® Leadership Award

Kimberly-Clark, along with its partners from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), were honored by the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) with a 2018 Leadership Award for Kimberly-Clark and WWF's "Heart Your Planet" collaboration. The program was unanimously selected for the Uncommon Partnership award for its success in engaging consumers to look for the WWF Panda logo and FSC® label on product packaging to support responsible forest management. "Kimberly-Clark continues to lead the U.S. tissue industry as a producer and influencer in promoting the importance of making more responsible products that use FSC®-certified fiber," said Jay Gottleib, president of Kimberly-Clark's North American Family Care business. "We are proud to have the WWF Panda logo and FSC® label printed on our packaging. This shows our support for these organizations, and demonstrates to our consumers that by using their favorite paper towel, facial and bath tissue, they are helping protect our forests." Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Trees outside forests: magnifying the climate change mitigation role of our trees

COP24 starts today, and once again, climate change is in the global spotlight. At PEFC, we have spent nearly 20 years helping to mitigate climate change through the promotion of sustainable forest management. With the inclusion of trees outside forests, we are now further enhancing our positive impact. We know that healthy, well-managed forests help combat climate change. By capturing and storing carbon, forests remove significant volumes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Through certification, we demonstrate their responsible management and enhance the value to these forests, ensuring they remain forests and continue to carry out their vital climate change mitigation actions. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Increasing Cardboard Box Recycling at Home

Cardboard boxes — corrugated packaging, in industry speak — are the most widely-recycled packaging material in the nation. In 2017, nearly 90 percent of cardboard boxes used in the U.S. were recovered for recycling. Most cardboard boxes are used for shipments of consumer products to retailers. Many of these large stores – think Walmart, Target, supermarket chains and shopping malls – have machines onsite to turn the unpacked cardboard boxes into neat bales of broken down, flat cardboard that are then sold to paper recyclers. It’s an efficient process that delivers optimum quality material to make new cardboard boxes. The rise of e-commerce has many people turning to the internet for their shopping, leading to a lot of cardboard boxes being delivered directly to consumers’ homes instead of retailers. The recovery rate of cardboard boxes from households varies, but tends to be lower than the rate from retail stores. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Christmas Recycling

When you’re wrapped up in the excitement of Christmas, keeping sustainability in mind can be difficult. That’s why we’ve put together these handy guidelines to illustrate just how simple it can be to have a green Christmas! https://www.dssmith.com/recycling/insights/blogs/2018/11/christmas-recycling
Read More

Congratulations 2018 FSC Leadership Award Winners

Forest Stewardship Council announced its 2018 FSC Leadership Awards in a celebration to be held in conjunction with the Greenbuild Conference. Recognizing enduring commitments to forest conservation, the Awards highlight the people and companies whose work demonstrates uncommon excellence in the field of responsible forest management. “FSC received an unusually large number of Awards submissions this year, which indicates the high level of enthusiasm, passion, and progress that powers FSC’s growth today,” said Corey Brinkema, president of the Forest Stewardship Council U.S. “This year’s winners demonstrate that we can in fact conserve forests even as we use forest products in our businesses and our daily lives,” he added. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More

Starbucks recycled 25 million old paper coffee cups into new cups (fastcompany.com)

Earlier this year, Starbucks sent 18 truckloads of old paper cups to a paper mill in Wisconsin to prove a point: Contrary to a widespread myth, paper coffee cups can be recycled cost-effectively. The cups–25 million in total, from excess inventory that the coffee chain otherwise would have sent to landfill–were processed at the mill. Then the recycled fiber was sent to another partner to be incorporated into paperboard for new Starbucks cups. The pilot project was a way to “demonstrate that a coffee cup can be turned back into a coffee cup,” says Jay Hunsberger, VP of sales for North America from Sustana, the mill that recycled the old cups. At the mill, the cups were mixed with water and ground into a pulp with a seven-foot-tall corkscrew to begin to separate the plastic lining that helps keep coffee cups from getting soggy. The fibers were screened and washed to finish the separation, then made into sheets and sent to WestRock, a packaging company, to be made into paperboard. At a third company, Seda, the board was printed with the Starbucks logo and shaped into new cups. Click read more below for additional detail.
Read More
Back To Top
Close search
Search