ATA Truck Tonnage Index Rose 3.7% in November

American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index increased 3.7% in November after falling 5% in October. In November, the index equaled 112.2 (2015=100) compared with 108.3 in October. “The 2020 seesaw pattern continued in November as typical seasonality is not holding this year,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “It was a nice gain, but the rebound was not enough to make up for October’s drop. Robust retail freight, helped by consumer spending, especially e-commerce, and very lean inventories helped truck tonnage last month. Strong single-family housing starts are also aiding freight tonnage, but lackluster restaurant, manufacturing and energy sectors remain a drag. I expect these softer industries to benefit from widespread COVID-19 vaccinations in 2021.” October’s decrease was revised up to 5% from our November 24 press release.
Read More

Truckload Turnover Rises in Third Quarter

The annualized turnover rate at both large and small truckload carriers rose by double digit percentage points in the third quarter as the industry began bouncing back from a COVID-19 induced slump. “After a calamitous second quarter, trucking – along with the rest of the economy – began recovering in the third quarter, leading to a tightening of the driver market,” said American Trucking Associations Chief Economist Bob Costello. “With a more robust freight market, we saw an increase in carriers seeking drivers, which led to increased turnover. Additionally, the driver pool has decreased this year for a host of reasons, including fewer new drivers coming into the industry as truck driver training schools train less drivers due to social distancing requirements.” In the third quarter, the turnover rate at truckload carriers with more than $30 million in annual revenue rose 10 percentage points to 92% on an annualized basis. The rate at smaller truckload carriers rose 14 points to 74%. Despite the increases, the 2020 average turnover rate is still running behind 2019.
Read More

ATA Truck Tonnage Index Fell 6.3% in October

American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index decreased 6.3% in October after gaining 5.7% in September. In October, the index equaled 106.8 (2015=100) compared with 114 in September. “While there are indications that the economy is losing momentum, I believe October’s tonnage softness was more of a seasonal issue during a pandemic than anything else,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “Typical seasonality is off this year and it was a reason why October was down so much. Not seasonally adjusted tonnage was down a fraction as much as normal over the last five years during September, leading to a big seasonally adjusted gain. However, that means October’s not seasonally adjusted tonnage grew less than half as much as it typically does, leading to a big drop in the seasonally adjusted figure. There are plenty of carriers still saying that tonnage, retail tonnage in particular, is good.”
Read More

ATA Truck Tonnage Index Jumped 6.7% in September

American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index increased 6.7% in September after declining 5.3% in August. In September, the index equaled 115.1 (2015=100) compared with 107.9 in August. “September had a nice recovery after a significant decline in August,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “The truck freight market continues to be bifurcated, with strength in retail and home construction, but some continued weakness in industrial freight. During the third quarter, truck tonnage increased 2.4% over the second quarter, but fell 5.3% from a year earlier.” August’s decrease was revised up to -5.3% from our September 22 press release.
Read More

Numbers Driving the Optimism in Trucking, Then and Now

Growth in the U.S. economy boomed in 2018, slowed in 2019, and turned south in 2020 when COVID-19 started to spread widely in March. In 2019, trucks shipped 72.5% of all domestic tonnage, including an increase of 366 million tons over 2018. Also, across the northern and southern borders, trucks moved three-quarters of the value of trade between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Compared with previous recessions, trucking fared far better than the overall economy as the recession in the first half of 2020 was concentrated in the much less freight intensive, services sector. At the start of 2020, the U.S. remained in the longest economic expansion on record with the unemployment rate at 50-year lows. In the three primary categories of freight—retail, manufacturing, and housing construction—only manufacturing was struggling from an industry-specific recession in 2019. In January, retail sales notched a record high, and construction on new homes surged to its highest level in over a decade, according to the Census Bureau. Even manufacturing showed signs that it bottomed out in 2019, as the Institute for Supply Management’s Purchasing Managers Index reported an expanding manufacturing sector in January and February after 5 months of contraction.
Read More

ATA Freight Forecast Projects Continued Long-Term Growth in Volumes

Today, the American Trucking Associations released its latest ATA Freight Transportation Forecast: 2020 to 2031, which is conducted annually by IHS Markit, showing that despite contraction in 2020, the long-term trend for both trucking and overall freight shipments is still positive. Among the findings in this year’s Forecast: *Total freight volumes in 2020 are likely to collapse by 10.6% to 14.6 billion tons, although truck freight volumes falls a smaller 8.8%. *Trucking volumes are expected to rebound in 2021, rising 4.9% next year and then growing 3.2% per year on average through 2026. *Overall freight revenues in 2020 will total $879 billion, rising to $1.435 trillion in 2031.
Read More

Shipping Rates to Increase for FedEx Express, FedEx Ground and FedEx Freight Services

FedEx Express, FedEx Ground and FedEx Freight will increase shipping rates beginning January 4, 2021. These rate changes enable FedEx to continue investing in service enhancement, fleet maintenance, technology innovations and other areas to serve customers more effectively and efficiently. FedEx Express shipping rates will increase by an average of 4.9% for U.S. domestic, U.S. export and U.S. import services. FedEx Ground and FedEx Home Delivery shipping rates will increase by an average of 4.9%. FedEx SmartPost shipping rates will also increase. FedEx Freight shipping rates will increase by an average of 4.9% for customers who use FXF PZONE and FXF EZONE, and by 5.9% for customers who use FXF 1000 and FXF 501 for shipments within the U.S. (including Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) and between the contiguous U.S. and Canada. FedEx Freight shipping rates will also increase for shipments within Canada, within Mexico, and between the contiguous U.S. and Mexico. Details of all changes to rates, surcharges and fees are available on the FedEx website at: http://fedex.com/rates2021.
Read More

The Postal Regulatory Commission Approves USPS’ Temporary Price Increase for Commercial Parcels

The Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) has approved the temporary price increases for commercial domestic parcel products that USPS proposed last month. Retail prices for parcel products are unaffected. The planned commercial price increases for Priority Mail Express, Priority Mail, First-Class Package Service (FCPS) and Commercial Parcel Select will take effect Oct. 18, 2020 at 12 a.m. Central time and continue until Dec. 27, 2020 at 12 a.m. Central time. After that, prices will revert to 2020 prices. The temporary price adjustments are in response to heightened package volume due to the coronavirus pandemic, as well as expected increases in online shopping during the holidays. Details at: https://www.prc.gov/docs/114/114473/Order5673.pdf
Read More

UPS Expanding Kansas City Air Operations

It takes plenty of space to park a wide-body cargo jet, and UPS’s facility at Kansas City International Airport is getting a lot more of it. The facility, known as an air gateway, is being renovated and expanded. The most visible part of the work is expanding the ramp from two aircraft parking spots to five. The new ramp will be 534,000 square feet, more than nine football fields in size. In addition to the new ramp, UPS also will install new sorting equipment at the gateway, more than tripling package handling capacity to 5,000 packages per hour. Construction in Kansas City is planned to begin in late October with completion in the fall of 2021.
Read More

ATA Truck Tonnage Index Fell 5.1% in July

American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index decreased 5.1% in July after surging 8.9% in June. In July, the index equaled 109.6 (2015=100) compared with 115.5 in June. Despite July’s decline, the index was 3.3% above the recent low in May. June’s increase was revised up slightly to 8.9% from our July 21 press release. Compared with July 2019, the SA index contracted 8.3%, the fourth straight year-over-year decline. Year-to-date, compared with the same period in 2019, tonnage is down 3.2%.
Read More

ATA Truck Tonnage Index Jumped 8.7% in June

American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index increased 8.7% in June after falling 1% in May. In June, the index equaled 115.3 (2015=100) compared with 106.1 in May. May’s drop was unrevised at -1% from our June 23 press release. Compared with June 2019, the SA index contracted 1.3%, the third straight year-over-year decline, but the smallest over that period. Year-to-date, compared with the same period in 2019, tonnage is down 2.4%.
Read More

Coyote Logistics Launches Dynamic Route Optimization to Enhance Supply Chain Efficiency

Coyote Logistics, a leading global third-party logistics (3PL) provider, expanded its Dynamic Route Optimization program that aims to streamline supply chain operations and reduce uncertainty for carriers by maximizing the efficiency of their fleets and delivering load consistency through optimized weekly routing plans. Dynamic Route Optimization builds suggested weekly route plans that optimally direct drivers to and from their domicile location by taking numerous parameters into account, including drivers’ hours provided by the carrier, load attributes, average load and unload times, market cost, mile per hour bands by region, home base city, among others and layering them over Coyote’s open and available loads.
Read More

Trucking Moved 11.84 Billion Tons of Freight in 2019

The trucking industry generated $791.7 billion in revenue in 2019, moving 11.84 billion tons of freight, according to the latest edition of American Trucking Associations’ annual data compendium – ATA American Trucking Trends 2020. “Despite a challenging year, the data contained in American Trucking Trends shows the industry was in good shape entering the global pandemic,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “Trends continues to be an indispensable, one-stop resource for decision makers to have the latest information about the state of the trucking industry.”
Read More

ATA Truck Tonnage Index Fell 1% in May

American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index contracted 1% in May after falling 10.3% in April. In May, the index equaled 106.1 (2015=100) compared with 107.2 in April. “While tonnage fell in May, even though other economic indicators like retail sales and housing starts rose, I’m not overly concerned,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “First, while down over 10 percent sequentially in April, truck tonnage did not fall as much as other economic indicators that month. This means that any rebound is tougher since tonnage didn’t fall substantially to begin with. Second, there are indications that freight continues to improve as more and more states and localities lift lockdown restrictions.” April’s drop was revised up to -10.3% from the 12.2% decline reported in our May 19 press release.
Read More

Trucking Industry Applauds House Advancing Highway Funding Bill

The American Trucking Associations praised the leaders and members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee for their work in advancing the INVEST in America Act to the House floor. “Chairman DeFazio and the entire committee have produced a solid piece of legislation that authorizes a real and significant increase in funding for our roads and bridges, as well as a broad range of policies to improve highway safety,” said ATA President and CEO Chris Spear. “ATA supports this bill and appreciates the hard work of the committee members and staff, and we look forward to working with Congress to further improve this important bill as it continues through the process, and securing bipartisan support for an infrastructure investment package that provides real money for our roads and bridges.”
Read More

ATA Chairman highlights trucking’s essential role throughout COVID-19

Randy Guillot, chairman of the American Trucking Associations and president of Triple G Express and Southeastern Motor Freight out of Jefferson, Louisiana, testified before the Senate Commerce Committee on the U.S. trucking industry’s response to the COVID-19 crisis—and on the role trucking will play in leading our economic recovery. Due to the U.S. Senate’s social distancing protocols, Guillot testified remotely via video conference from his home state of Louisiana. From his opening remarks: “Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the trucking industry has been thrust to the forefront of our national consciousness. While most activity ground to a halt across the country, America’s 3.5 million professional truck drivers kept moving. These heroes continue serving on the frontlines, ensuring everyone has the goods they need to get through these challenging times. “We hear the term ‘essential’ more frequently of late—as America wakes up to the gravity of what essential truly means. Truckers are the difference between a fully-stocked grocery store and one lined with empty shelves. They’re why doctors and nurses have PPE to protect themselves. They’re how test kits get to hot-spots for local officials to use to fight the virus’ spread.”
Read More

Oil trades mixed but recent rally sets crude up for strong 2018 gains

Crude gains have been buoyed by a dispute in Libya over oil-marketing rights that is hindering the North African nation’s export capacity. In Libya, the supply of up to 780,000 barrels of crude a day is at risk, according to analysts at Commerzbank. Separately, the energy market has been reacting to threats from the Trump administration this week, who indicated that the White House would look to sanction countries that don’t reduce their imports of Iranian crude to “zero” by Nov. 4. Iran currently exports around 2.4 million barrels a day of crude. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

U.S. oil prices settle at highest since 2014 as crude supplies notch biggest weekly drop of the year

The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported Wednesday that crude supplies declined by 9.9 million barrels for the week ended June 22—the largest weekly decline so far this year. Analysts surveyed by S&P Global Platts had forecast a fall of 2.3 million barrels, while the American Petroleum Institute on Tuesday reported a drop of 9.2 million barrels. “Record crude exports and record refinery runs have combined to yield the biggest draw to crude stocks so far this year,” said Matt Smith, director of commodity research at ClipperData. “Even crude production holding at a record level has been unable to offset strong domestic and international demand.” The EIA pegged last week’s total domestic crude output at 10.9 million barrels a day, unchanged from the previous week. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Crude Oil Prices Settle Higher as US Says Nations Must Cut Iranian Crude Imports

Strong buying emerged in oil markets Tuesday as focus shifted to an expected decline in Iranian crude exports after a senior U.S. State Department official said countries must stop purchasing crude by the start of November or face sanctions. Companies that buy Iranian crude oil must completely halt those exports by Nov. 4 or else they will face powerful U.S. sanctions, a senior State Department official told reporters on Tuesday. Oil prices moved sharply higher as investor focus shifted to the prospect of a void in global supplies as Iran – OPEC's third largest producer – exports more than 2 million barrels per day (bpd). Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil steady as outages balance trade dispute, OPEC

Oil prices steadied on Tuesday, supported by Canadian production losses and uncertainty over Libyan exports, but under pressure from climbing OPEC supply and escalating trade conflicts between the United States and other major economies. Eastern Libyan commander Khalifa Haftar's forces have given control of oil ports to a separate National Oil Corporation (NOC) based in the country's east. The official state-owned oil company from the capital Tripoli, also called NOC, will no longer be allowed to handle that oil, he said. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Nearly half of Iowa crude oil spill contained, BNSF says

Workers have contained nearly half of the crude oil spilled near Rock River in northwest Iowa over the weekend following a freight train derailment on Friday, BNSF Railway Co said. About 100,000 gallons had been hemmed off using booms out of the estimated 230,000 gallons spilled, BNSF said in a statement on Saturday. The spill has raised concerns about drinking water downstream. The company did not respond to questions on Sunday about the progress of the cleanup. No one was hurt in the derailment, in which 32 cars came off the rails, 14 of which leaked at least some of their contents, BNSF said. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

OPEC, Having Bolstered Oil Prices, Considers Ramping Up Production

Major oil-producing countries moved on Friday toward an agreement to jointly raise exports, a decision that has driven considerable division among them but that could temper criticism from President Trump. Officials from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, as well as other major producers like Russia, were set to increase their total output by less than 1 percent of the global oil supply. Though a relatively small addition to the world energy market, the move nevertheless signals a willingness by international suppliers to address rising prices. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

UPS And International Brotherhood Of Teamsters Reach Handshake Agreement For New National Master Agreement

Months of collective bargaining have culminated in a tentative agreement for UPS (NYSE: UPS) and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. The five-year agreement, which is subject to ratification, covers Teamsters-represented UPS employees in small package roles. UPS’s goal has been to reward the company’s employees for their contributions to its success while enabling the business to remain flexible to meet its customers’ needs – each of these goals have been met in the new agreement. UPS is well-positioned to grow and meet the needs of its customers. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

U.S. oil prices end higher after biggest weekly drop in U.S. crude supplies since January

Prices for U.S. benchmark oil futures settled with a gain Wednesday, at a nearly one-week high, after U.S. government data revealed the biggest weekly decline in U.S. crude supplies since January. Global benchmark Brent crude prices, however, finished lower as traders monitored comments from major oil producers gathering for the much-anticipated Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries meeting at the end of the week. The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported Wednesday that crude supplies dropped by 5.9 million barrels for the week ended June 15. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil steady ahead of OPEC meeting

Oil prices steadied on Wednesday, supported by a drop in U.S. commercial crude inventories and the loss of storage capacity in Libya, but under pressure ahead of a meeting of OPEC exporters which may increase global production. U.S. crude inventories fell by 3 million barrels to 430.6 million barrels in the week to June 15, according to an American Petroleum Institute report on Tuesday. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Crude Oil Prices Settle Higher as OPEC Reportedly Mulls Modest Output Hike

Members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) are discussing an agreement that would raise oil output by 300,000 to 600,000 barrels a day (bpd) over the next few months, Bloomberg reported, citing people briefed on the talks. That is well below the 1.5 million bpd uptick in production touted a few weeks ago, reducing investor fears of a significant slowdown in rebalancing in oil markets, which could potentially hurt oil prices. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

China Tariffs Hurt US Crude Oil Price

The war of words over trade between the United States and China finally turned into an actual trade war Friday, after the administration of President Donald Trump announced a list of goods whose import from China, worth $50 billion in 2017, would be subject to an additional tariff of 25 percent. Among the retaliatory measures announced by the Asian country was the proposed imposition of tariffs on imports of petroleum products from the U.S., a move that sent domestic crude oil prices crashing. The fall in WTI crude is not in tandem with the global benchmark, Brent crude, which was trading about 0.7 percent higher Monday morning than a day before. The two prices are separated by a few dollars, Brent usually costing more, but that gap has increased in recent weeks for a number of reasons. However, the different directions in trade at present are caused largely by China’s announcement. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Crude Oil Prices Settle Higher as Saudi Says Output Hike Will Be Reasonable

Traders remained concerned rising output would slow the rebalancing in oil markets as the production-cut agreement has helped rid the market of excess crude supplies. Inventories of U.S. crude fell by 4.143 million barrels for the week ended June 8, well above expectations for a draw of 1.440 million barrels, according to data from the Energy Information Administration. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil prices fall as U.S. crude production hits another record

Oil prices eased on Thursday, dragged down by rising output, although strong demand and a drop in U.S. fuel inventories provided the market with some support. Prices were pulled down by another rise in U.S. oil production , which hit a weekly record of 10.9 million barrels per day (bpd) last week, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on Wednesday. U.S. crude output has risen by almost 30 percent in the last two years, and it is now close to top global producer Russia, which produced 11.1 million bpd overall in the first two weeks of June. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

ANDRITZ acquires Novimpianti, Italy

International technology Group ANDRITZ has signed a contract for the acquisition of Novimpianti Drying Technology S.r.l., a company owned by Novigroup S.r.l. and based in Lucca, Italy. Novimpianti has approximately 40 employees and generates annual sales of approximately 10 million euros. Novimpianti is a global supplier of engineered equipment and services for air and energy systems to the paper industry’s leading manufacturers. For ANDRITZ, the acquisition of Novimpianti further strengthens its product offerings in the field of air and energy systems, mainly for tissue and paperboard machines. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

US crude ticks up as OPEC says oil market outlook is uncertain

Oil prices were mixed on Tuesday, with U.S. crude gaining and Brent crude slumping, as investors prepared for a key meeting of the OPEC producer group next week. Crude future were in line with the broader financial markets, which were largely unruffled by a U.S.-North Korea summit aimed at the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. OPEC and other producing countries including Russia have cut oil output by 1.8 million barrels per day (bpd) since January 2017 in an effort to boost the market. The group holds its next meeting on June 22-23, and is expected to decide on future supply policy. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Saudi Arabia to supply full July crude oil volumes to some Asian buyers

Saudi Arabia has informed five Asian refiners that it will supply full contractual volumes of crude oil in July, five sources with knowledge of the matter said on Tuesday. The world's top crude exporter has also reinstated contracted volumes of Arab Heavy crude to one buyer after cutting supplies in the previous month, one of the sources said. Last month, the state oil giant maintained full contractual supplies to Asia for June supplies by replacing Arab Heavy with Arab Light. The Arab Heavy was redirected to domestic power plants to meet the increased demand for electricity for summer cooling needs. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Slips on Signs Russia Boosted Crude Output Before OPEC Meets

Futures dropped 1.1 percent in New York after a third weekly loss. Russia, which along with Saudi Arabia is trying to garner support for lifting output limits, was said to have boosted production earlier this month to above the level envisioned by OPEC. Meanwhile, the number of rigs drilling for crude in the U.S. inched higher, signaling output may extend a record. Saudi Arabia and Russia, among the countries with spare capacity to raise production, signaled last month they may restore output even though they hadn’t yet consulted most other producers. Oil prices have fallen more than 7 percent since the two nations made their proposal public. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Heidelberg starts selling its new charging system for electric cars

Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG (Heidelberg) has now launched its new charging system for electric cars in Germany. The Heidelberg Wallbox Home Eco is the first ever product for end customers in a company history that spans almost 170 years. The system is aimed at individuals and also at businesses and local authorities that want to use the charging station to recharge the electric vehicles in their own fleets as well as those of customers and visitors. The Wallbox Home Eco has a CE-compliant design. Heidelberg developed all the power electronics itself and they are produced exclusively in Germany. Comparable solutions from Heidelberg have already proved a market success, with over 20,000 Wallboxes for the electric cars of a premium manufacturer and over 100,000 smart charging cables manufactured to customer specifications. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Prices Cool After Recent Rally

Oil prices edged lower Friday, giving up some of the ground made in a recent rally spurred by supply concerns in Venezuela and Iran. The economic crisis in Venezuela is curtailing the country’s oil production, while the planned reinstatement of U.S. sanctions against Iran is expected to hit production from the third-largest member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil settles at 2-month low as crude supplies rise unexpectedly

The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported Wednesday that crude supplies climbed by 2.1 million barrels for the week ended June 1. Analysts surveyed by S&P Global Platts had forecast a decline of 1.3 million barrels, while the American Petroleum Institute on Tuesday reported a fall of 2 million barrels, according to sources. The EIA also reported that total domestic crude production rose by 31,000 barrels a day to fresh weekly record of 10.8 million barrels a day. Gasoline stockpiles jumped by 4.6 million barrels for the week, while distillate stockpiles rose 2.2 million barrels, according to the EIA. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil steady on Venezuela exports, supply concerns

Oil prices steadied on Wednesday after Venezuela raised the prospect of a halt to some crude exports, easing worries about oversupply after reports that the U.S. government had asked Saudi Arabia and some other producers to increase output. Falling Venezuelan oil output helped push crude benchmark Brent LCOc1 to more than $80 a barrel last month, but prices have eased since then on talk of higher supply by other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil climbs, but record U.S. crude output, higher OPEC supplies drag

Oil prices edged higher on Tuesday after falling nearly 2 percent in the previous session, but growing U.S. production and expectations of higher OPEC supplies continue to weigh on sentiment. Over the weekend, OPEC and non-OPEC Arab oil ministers agreed on the need for continued cooperation to balance global supply, Kuwait's state news agency KUNA reported. In March, U.S. crude output rose to 10.47 million barrels per day, the highest on record, according to a monthly report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil down as U.S. supply grows, OPEC considers higher output

U.S. crude production climbed in March to 10.47 million barrels per day (bpd), a monthly record, data from the Energy Information Administration showed last week. U.S. drillers added two oil rigs in the week to June 1, bringing the total to 861, the most since March 2015, energy services company Baker Hughes said on Friday. That was the eighth time drillers have added rigs in the past nine weeks. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Brent premium over WTI hits new 3-year high

The spread between Brent crude oil futures contracts and U.S. WTI stood at its widest for three years on Friday with the latter set for a second consecutive week of declines as U.S. oil output comes close to matching that of top producer Russia. The premium has doubled to more than $11 a barrel in about a month as a lack of pipeline capacity in the United States traps much of the output inland. U.S. crude production has been rising to record levels since late last year. In March, it jumped 215,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 10.47 million bpd, a new monthly record, the Energy Information Administration said on Thursday. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Slips as U.S. Crude Inventories Show Signs of Increasing

Oil fell, compounding a monthly decline, after U.S. crude inventories were said to rise by more than expected. Futures in New York fell 0.6 percent, set for the first monthly drop since February. On Wednesday, the American Petroleum Institute was said to report a 1 million barrel increase in crude stockpiles, double the gain forecast in a Bloomberg survey of analysts. Prices have declined about 4 percent since Saudi Arabia and Russia last week proposed to phase out supply curbs by OPEC and its allies. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Holds Near $67 as Market Tumult Subsides After OPEC Worries

Oil steadied near $67 a barrel as markets regained some composure following renewed trade tensions between the U.S. and China, political turmoil in Europe and simmering concerns that OPEC may ease its output curbs. Futures in New York were little changed, though still almost $6 below last week’s high. China said it would respond accordingly to U.S. President Donald Trump’s plan to impose tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese imports. Encouraging economic data in Europe blunted panic related to Italy’s political crisis, which on Tuesday helped boost a gauge of oil market volatility to its highest level since February. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil prices are falling fast. Here’s why

What a difference a week can make. Oil prices surged to their highest level in over three years last week, and strategists were marveling that prices had shot up so quickly. Now prices are slumping. US crude oil futures have dropped by nearly 10% to trade around $66.50 per barrel, down from about $73 last week. Global benchmark Brent crude oil has dropped by about 6% to trade around $76, after peaking above $80. The sharp price decline was triggered on Friday by Saudi Arabia, the biggest oil exporter in the world and de facto leader of oil cartel OPEC. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil prices slide as OPEC, Russia mull output increase

Oil prices plunged on Friday as reports said OPEC and Russia are considering lifting production by as much as 1 million barrels a day to meet the shortfall in supply from Iran and Venezuela. The losses came after media reports hit saying the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russia are discussing plans to lift their production for the first time since 2016. Bloomberg said the major producers are considering pumping between 300,000 and 800,000 more barrels of oil a day, while Reuters said the number could be as high as 1 million barrels. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil slips further below $80 a barrel as focus on OPEC intensifies

Oil prices recorded their largest one-day drop in two weeks on Thursday, with expectations building that OPEC will end an output deal that has been in place since the start of 2017 due to concerns about supplies from Venezuela and Iran. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries may decide in June to lift output to make up for reduced supply from Iran and Venezuela and in response to concerns from Washington about a rally in oil prices, OPEC and oil industry sources told Reuters. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Wood to Supercapacitors: Sustainable highly conductive electrode materials from ultrathin carbon nanofiber aerogels derived from nanofibrillated cellulose

Carbon aerogels are ultralight, conductive materials, which are extensively investigated for applications in supercapacitor electrodes in electrical cars and cell phones. Chinese scientists have now found a way to make these electrodes sustainably. The aerogels can be obtained directly from cellulose nanofibrils, the abundant cell-wall material in wood, finds the study reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Supercapacitors are capacitors that can take up and release a very large amount of energy in a very short time. Key requirements for supercapacitor electrodes are a large surface area and conductivity, combined with a simple production method. Another growing issue in supercapacitor production—mainly for smartphone and electric car technologies—is sustainability. However, sustainable and economical production of carbon aerogels as supercapacitor electrode materials is possible, propose Shu-Hong Yu and colleagues from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Here’s what happens if the oil rally turns into an ‘oil shock’

The global oil benchmark flirted with the $80-a-barrel level again on Tuesday, underlining concerns that an unexpectedly strong crude rally could eventually begin to weigh on economic growth. The combination of renewed U.S. sanctions on Iran, potential sanctions on Venezuela, a rising geopolitical risk premium, strong demand and other factors have made talk of $100 crude sound less outlandish. Indeed, some analysts argue that the backdrop now leaves the market more open to potential price spikes. So what if oil did climb back to triple digits for the first time since 2014? Economists led by Arend Kapteyn at UBS laid it out in a wide-ranging note on Tuesday. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

US crude rises 1.4% to 3.5-year high on Venezuela and Iran supply concerns

Crude prices strengthened on Monday, reversing course as geopolitical tensions continued to support the market and a trade war between the U.S. and China was declared "on hold." Geopolitical concerns that U.S. sanctions on Iran could curb the country's crude exports have led crude prices to trade higher in recent weeks, and the market is now weighing the possibility of additional sanctions on Venezuela following the country's presidential election. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Turpentine: A Surprising Journey from Forest to Flavors and Fragrances

What do toothpaste, perfume, soap and ink have in common? The surprising answer is turpentine. This versatile byproduct of the pulp- and paper-making process is used in a wide range of everyday products. Consider a typical day: You wake up and brush your teeth. Then you take a shower using your favorite soap. After you get dressed, you apply some makeup or a spritz of cologne or perfume. You might not have realized it, but before you left home this morning, you used a number of products that contain a special form of turpentine that Domtar makes. Your perfume’s floral fragrance and your toothpaste’s minty freshness originated as crude sulfate turpentine, a USDA-certified, all-natural and renewable byproduct of the pulp- and paper-making process. In fact, many of the scents and flavorings in products you encounter every day are derived from byproducts of the pulp- and paper-making process. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Sun Chemical Forges Distribution Partnership with Cyngient

Sun Chemical has named Cyngient as a strategic distribution partner of its inks, coatings, and other solutions for offset, narrow web tag and label (NWTL), commercial sheetfed and folding carton printers. The new partnership allows Sun Chemical and Cyngient to reach their North American inks customers faster and more efficiently, and jointly provide customers with technical and product support. Cyngient customers will now have access to Sun Chemical’s full range of solutions for the marketplace which can be combined with many of Cyngient’s specialties, including special effects, soft touch and tactile coatings, cold foil solutions, and in-mold products. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

US crude ends flat, settling at $71.49, as oil fails to hold gains on Iran sanctions concern

Brent, the international benchmark for oil prices, hit a session high of $80.50 a barrel on Thursday, its strongest level since Nov. 24, 2014, when it topped out at $80.85. The contract eased back to $79.19 by 2:25 p.m. ET, down 9 cents. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude ended the day unchanged from the previous session at $71.49 a barrel. WTI earlier hit a high going back to Nov. 28, 2014 at $72.30 a barrel. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

IEA warns global oil demand may suffer as crude nears $80

Global demand for oil is likely to moderate this year, as the price of crude nears $80 a barrel and many key importing nations no longer offer consumers generous fuel subsidies, the International Energy Agency said on Wednesday. Oil has risen 51 percent in the last year, driven by coordinated supply cuts and, this month, by concern over Iranian supply after the United States said it would reimpose sanctions on Tehran over its nuclear activities. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil gains while U.S. crude’s discount to Brent deepens

Oil prices rose on Monday as OPEC reported that the global oil glut has been virtually eliminated, while U.S. crude’s discount to global benchmark Brent widened to more than $7, its deepest in five months. U.S. shale production is expected to hit a record 7.18 million barrels per day (bpd), the Energy Information Administration said. The production growth may be far from over, contributing to U.S. crude’s discount to Brent, analysts said.
Read More

Crude Oil Prices Up After Geopolitical Issue Eases

The oil prices were bullish in the market as geopolitical tensions in the Middle East dies down. The commodity’s prices managed to hit another milestone despite the astonishing performance of the dollar in the market. The commodity continues to push great performance in the market on multiple factors. The great oil inventories reports and the OPEC agreement to extend the output cut have managed to put the prices on its best figures ones again. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

U.S. oil prices hover at 3 1/2 year highs, as analysts entertain the idea of $100 crude

The expectation that sanctions will again frustrate Iran’s oil industry and limit global supply has helped to boost prices close to 5% since the announcement. In the past, sanctions against Iran have cut the country’s crude exports by around 1 million barrels a day. But because the European Union and other intentional players have decided to stick with the deal, U.S. sanctions are likely to affect only up to around 350,000 barrels a day, once reinstated within six months’ time, according to analysts at MUFG Bank. The surge in prices this week prompted renewed oil market speculation that Brent could again reach $100 a barrel — a level not seen since before the price crash of late 2014. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Tronox Reports First Quarter 2018 Financial Results

First Quarter 2018 Highlights: - Strong top and bottom line performance reflects benefits of vertical integration and continued favorable market conditions across TiO2 pigment, feedstock and co-products - Revenue of $442 million up 17 percent versus prior year - Income from operations of $14 million; adjusted EBITDA of $113 million up 79 percent versus prior year (Non-GAAP) - TiO2 income from operations of $52 million; adjusted EBITDA of $138 million up 62 percent versus prior year (Non-GAAP) - TiO2 adjusted EBITDA margin of 31 percent; free cash flow of $52 million. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

The Iran Deal Is Dead; Here’s What That Means for Crude Oil Prices

Short term, oil-pricing volatility will continue. Traders will likely consider any forward interruption – perceived or actual – in Iranian crude export flow as upward pressure on global prices. If this happens and JCPOA is not immediately closed, (i.e., should those second and third possible scenarios I mentioned play out), there will be a pullback. Overall, other factors have been contributing to an increasing floor for the oil-pricing band, supported by continuing OPEC production problems in Venezuela, Nigeria, and Libya. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

US crude oil slips ahead of Trump decision on Iran

US crude oil prices have slipped back after strong gains as the White House prepared to announce a decision on whether it will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal. Iran’s oil production has bounced back to nearly 4m barrels a day since world powers eased sanctions over its nuclear programme. Reimposing sanctions could reduce Iranian oil exports by 200,000-300,000 barrels a day, according to RBC Capital Markets. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Iran nuclear worries pushes crude oil to 4-year high

Brent crude on Monday touched its highest level since 2014 as oil prices increased on rising tension between the US and Iran. The international oil price, which has benefited from a lift in US demand and Opec supply constraints this year, rose nearly 1 per cent to $75.53 in European trading after earlier hitting a session peak of $75.89, its highest level since November 2014. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil slips as OPEC, Iran worries bump against U.S. output

Oil prices slipped on Thursday as swelling U.S. crude inventories and record weekly U.S. production clashed with OPEC supply cuts and the potential for new U.S. sanctions against Iran. On Wednesday, a report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed a 6.2-million-barrel jump in U.S. crude inventories C-STK-T-EIA. U.S. oil production rose to a record of 10.62 million bpd, putting it ahead of Saudi Arabia, the biggest OPEC producer. U.S. drilling for new production is also increasing, encouraged by rising prices following OPEC’s production curbs. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Trades Near $68 Before U.S. Stockpile Data, Iran Decision

Futures in New York increased 0.6 percent after a 1.9 percent drop on Tuesday. U.S. crude inventories rose 3.43 million barrels last week, the American Petroleum Institute was said to report. That compares with a 1.23 million-barrel gain in a Bloomberg poll of analysts ahead of Wednesday’s government data. The oil market has priced in a more than 50 percent probability that the U.S. will sanction Iran, according to Standard Chartered Plc. If the API’s stockpiles data is reflected in the government announcement, it would be the biggest build since early March. The industry body was also said to show crude inventories in the American oil-storage hub of Cushing, Oklahoma, rose by 725,000 barrels last week. Gasoline stocks increased by 1.6 million barrels while distillates declined 4.08 million. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Slides While Traders Await Trump Decision on Iran Accord

Futures in New York dropped as much as 1.1 percent after rising 0.5 percent earlier. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said his country has documents that prove Iran had a program to build atomic bombs. That’s raising concern Trump may pull the U.S. out of a nuclear accord between Iran and world powers, a move that energy consultant FGE says could cut the Persian Gulf nation’s 2019 oil exports by 700,000 barrels a day. FGE Chairman Fereidun Fesharaki said Trump is likely to restore sanctions on Iran, meaning buyers would have to cut their crude purchases from the country in 180 days. The nation’s exports could drop by 200,000 to 500,000 barrels a day this year, leading to higher oil prices, he said. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Pares Monthly Gain as U.S. Rigs Counter Iran-Deal Risk

Futures in New York are up 3.7 percent this month, even after a 1 percent drop on Monday, following data that showed an increase in U.S. drilling activity. A potential withdrawal in May by U.S. President Donald Trump from a 2015 nuclear deal between world powers and Iran would reimpose sanctions on the Middle Eastern producer and curb its exports. Meanwhile, OPEC is trimming output even after concluding it has cleared 97 percent of the surplus that has weighed on prices. “Obviously the rig count that came on Friday was quite bearish,” says Torbjorn Kjus, chief oil analyst at DNB Bank ASA. “There’s a lot of profit in the books here for the non-commercials. You shouldn’t be surprised if there’s a $5 flush out and some profit taking.” In the U.S., working oil rigs rose by five last week to 825, the highest level since March 2015, according to data from Baker Hughes. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Steadies as Traders Weigh Impact of Korea Summit, Iran Deal

Futures in New York slipped 0.4 percent, on course for a 0.7 percent drop this week. French President Emmanuel Macron earlier this week predicted President Donald Trump will exit the Iran agreement, while U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Thursday a decision on a withdrawal hasn’t been made. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in agreed to finally end seven decades of hostile relations this year. Oil this month touched the highest level in more than three years as speculation swirled over the potential breakup of the nuclear accord that Iran signed with world powers in 2015. The deal had lifted sanctions on the Islamic Republic, enabling it to boost oil production by about 1 million barrels a day. Investors are also watching global inventories amid signs that production cuts by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies could continue to deepen while American output soars. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

AF&PA: Senate Confirmation of USTB Nominees Critical to Advancing Overdue Freight Rail Reform

Underscoring the need for long-overdue freight rail reform, American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) President and CEO Donna Harman urged the United States Senate to quickly confirm the nominations of Patrick Fuchs and Michelle Schultz to the U.S. Surface Transportation Board. The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation approved the nominations on Wednesday, April 25. “As one of the largest manufacturing sectors in the nation, the paper and wood products industry relies on the nation’s rails to move millions of tons of materials to production mills and final markets. Revoking the outdated commodity exemption policy and addressing harmful service failures and higher pricing will help ensure the accessibility of effective, streamlined and competitive rail service to our companies all rail customers. We thank the committee for its approval and urge the Senate to quickly confirm Mr. Fuchs and Ms. Schultz.”
Read More

Oil heads up to $74 a barrel, but U.S. bonds, crude supply cast a pall

Oil edged higher on Wednesday, nearing three-year highs reached the previous day, as rising U.S. fuel inventories and production weighed on an otherwise bullish market. Weekly data on Tuesday that showed a rise in U.S. crude inventories also subdued the oil price somewhat. The prospect of fresh sanctions on Tehran and disruption to the country’s oil flows has helped push the oil price to its highest since late 2014 this month.
Read More

Oil tops $75, highest since 2014 OPEC meeting that led to pump war

“Prices are being driven up by tight supply due to high production outages in Venezuela plus the cuts implemented by OPEC and Russia,” said Carsten Fritsch, analyst at Commerzbank. “What is more, demand appears robust.” The United States has until May 12 to decide whether to quit a nuclear deal with Iran and reimpose sanctions against the third-largest producer in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, tightening global supplies. OPEC’s supply curtailments and the threat of new sanctions are occurring as demand in Asia, the biggest oil-consuming region, has risen to a record. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Holds Near $68 as Rising U.S. Drilling Counters OPEC Curbs

Futures in New York dropped as much as 0.8 percent after data showed American drillers added five working oil rigs last week, stoking fears over surging U.S. output. The May oil contract gained 1.5 percent last week before expiring Friday as OPEC producers said supply curbs should continue in order to revive investments in oil and gas production. In the U.S., explorers have added 23 rigs so far this month, bringing the total working rigs to 820 last week, Baker Hughes data showed. The nation’s crude production has more than doubled from the lows of a decade ago, topping 10 million barrels a day each week since early February.
Read More

Oil Erases Gains After Trump Slams OPEC for Inflating Prices

Oil fell in New York after U.S. President Donald Trump criticized OPEC and said crude prices are “artificially Very High.” The comments came as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries and allies including Russia showed willingness to further tighten oil markets and boost prices. Oil has rallied in recent weeks as output cuts from OPEC and its allies were compounded by heightened geopolitical risks, including the possibility of renewed U.S. sanctions on Iran. Meeting in Jeddah, a committee of OPEC and other oil producers found high levels of compliance with the production curbs. Still, there’s capacity for prices to rise beyond this week’s three-year high, according to Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih, who said cooperation between producers would continue into 2019. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Rises Amid Shrinking U.S. Surplus as OPEC Prepares to Gather

Futures in New York rose 2.9 percent on Wednesday. An Energy Information Administration report showed shrinking American petroleum surpluses and the first crude withdrawal from the largest U.S. storage complex in six weeks. The U.S. draw-downs underlined optimism that an OPEC-led effort to curb global supplies will be reinforced later this week when the cartel and allied producers gather in Saudi Arabia. The EIA reported U.S. crude stockpiles dropped 1.07 million barrels last week, while supplies at the Cushing, Oklahoma, pipeline hub dropped by 1.12 million. Gasoline supplies fell 2.97 million barrels and distillate stocks slid 3.11 million barrels to the lowest level since November. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Retreats on Speculation Syria Intervention Will Be Limited

Oil last week rose to levels last seen in 2014 amid growing geopolitical risks, with investors anticipating that retaliation against Assad would threaten production in the region, while tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran-backed rebels in Yemen also added to concerns. Still, surging U.S. output continues to weigh on investor sentiment even as the International Energy Agency says the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries is close to reaching its target of eliminating a global crude glut. Meanwhile, in the U.S., working oil rigs rose by seven last week to 815, the highest since March 2015, according to data from Baker Hughes. The rig fleet has expanded in 10 of the past 12 weeks. The expansion came after the Energy Information Administration data showed that American oil production rose to a fresh record of 10.5 million barrels a day. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Building Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Paper Biomass

A major byproduct in the papermaking industry is lignosulfonate, a sulfonated carbon waste material, which is typically combusted on site, releasing CO2 into the atmosphere after sulfur has been captured for reuse. Now researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a method to use this cheap and abundant paper biomass to build a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery. Such a battery could be used to power big data centers as well as provide a cheaper energy-storage option for microgrids and the traditional electric grid. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Real War Rattles Oil More Than Trade War or U.S. Crude Boom

Geopolitical tensions are affecting prices now and will lift crude higher if they persist, Fatih Birol, the executive director of the International Energy Agency, said in an interview on Thursday. Meanwhile, trade disputes such as the one between U.S. and China that’s hurt investor sentiment recently are not unusual and won’t have “a direct impact on oil markets for now,” he said on Bloomberg Television in New Delhi. Crude has surged to levels last seen in 2014 as the risk of violent conflict grips the market and raises concerns over potential Middle East supply disruptions. Top OPEC producer Saudi Arabia on Wednesday intercepted a missile attack by Yemeni rebels, who are seen as being supported by fellow group member Iran. That was after U.S. President Donald Trump warned Russia to expect an American missile barrage toward its ally, Syria. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Surges to 2-Week High as Trump Pledges Syria Missile Attack

Futures in New York rose as much as 1.3 percent after climbing the most in eight months on Tuesday. President Donald Trump has intensified preparations for a response to a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria, a move that could place the U.S. in direct conflict with Russian forces. While the Middle East country’s own oil production is limited, prices often respond to the risk of war in a region that holds almost half of the world’s crude reserves. “The focus is on the West’s probable military strike against the Syrian regime,” said Carsten Fritsch and Eugen Weinberg, analysts at Commerzbank AG in Frankfurt. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Sun Chemical and DIC Corporation to Increase Production Capacity of DAILUBE® Extreme Pressure Additives at Kashima Plant

Beginning in April 2018, Sun Chemical and its parent company, DIC Corporation, will increase the production capacity of its DAILUBE® extreme pressure additives by 6,000 tons per annum at its eco-friendly plant in Kashima, Japan. The move will better serve customers around the globe as well as promote and deliver its trusted and market leading sulfurized extreme pressure additives into new and existing markets. Optimized for metalworking fluids used in cutting, forming and rolling, DAILUBE extreme pressure additives are light in color, low odor and available in a range of chemistries, including olefin, lard, vegetable, ester, and fatty acid. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Trades Near Two-Week Low on Concern Over U.S.-China Dispute

Oil is losing steam after rising more than 5 percent last month as Trump repeatedly raises the stakes against China, rattling markets. Along with other risky assets, oil took a blow on concern the escalating tension will threaten growth that drives energy demand amid record U.S. output. That could hinder the efforts of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies to curb a global glut and prop up prices. “The market is currently concerned for the escalating China-U.S. trade war tensions,” said Bjarne Schieldrop, chief commodities analyst at SEB AB. “And with good reason, since this will be bad for global growth and oil demand growth further down the road.” Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

PRC Examination of USPS Financials Show Net Operating Loss of $1.3 Billion

In FY 2017, the Postal Service recorded its first net loss from operations, since FY 2013, of $1.3 billion, largely due to declining mail volume, the expiration of the exigent surcharge, and higher operating costs. However, including non-cash workers’ compensation costs and retirement expenses, the net loss from operations increases to a total net loss of $2.7 billion in FY 2017. This is an improvement of $2.8 billion compared to the total net loss in FY 2016. This improvement is the result of a $4.8 billion decrease in the retiree health benefits expense, and a $3.4 billion decrease in the non-cash workers’ compensation expense, offset by $2.4 billion in increased expenses that resulted from provisions in the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) for unfunded retirement benefit costs. Liquidity also continues to improve in FY 2017 and is at its highest level since FY 2007. However, liabilities on and off-balance sheet for pension and annuitant health benefits continue to threaten the improvements in liquidity. The Postal Service experienced a decline in revenue for most of its Market Dominant products. Consumer price index-based price increases were not sufficient to offset the decline in mail volume and the reduction in additional revenue from the expiration of the exigent surcharge. Overall Market Dominant Mail and Services revenue declined 7.7 percent from the previous year. First-Class Mail revenue declined by 6.7 percent while Marketing Mail revenue declined by 5.7 percent. Periodicals revenue also saw a decline of 8.8 percent. Conversely, package services revenue increased by 0.3 percent compared to FY 2016. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Thwarted by Trade War Fears as Trump Doubles Down on Tariffs

Futures fell as much as 1.1 percent in New York and are set for a 2.6 percent drop this week. Trump ordered his administration to consider levies on an additional $100 billion in imports from the Asian nation, spurring a flight from risk assets on concern a full-blown trade war will deter global economic growth. That was only a day after both American and Chinese officials signaled they’re willing to talk about the escalating conflict. “We now have to start looking at the U.S.-China trade war as a downward geopolitical risk,” said Olivier Jakob, managing director at consultants Petromatrix GmbH. “This is starting to not be funny anymore, and there is a risk to reach a point where global asset markets become tired of the White House wars and move back into cash.” Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Holds Near $63 as Crude Stocks Drop, Trade Tensions Abate

Prices are being affected by “a bullish oil-inventory report” from the U.S., said Michael Poulsen, an analyst at Global Risk Management Ltd. U.S. storage dropped by 4.62 million barrels to 425.3 million barrels last week, while outbound shipments of crude expanded to a record, according to an Energy Information Administration report Wednesday. The EIA data also showed that American oil production rose to an unprecedented 10.5 million barrels a day, topping the 10 million-barrel level for a ninth week. Global markets from equities to oil recovered after investor optimism grew that the U.S. and China will step back from the brink of a trade war. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Falls to 2-Week Low as China Retaliates in U.S. Trade War

Futures in New York slipped as much as 2.1 percent to the lowest intraday price since March 20. China’s Ministry of Commerce said it would levy 25 percent tariffs on imports of 106 U.S. products including automobiles and aircraft. That wiped out earlier support for prices as Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries output dropped to the lowest in a year in March. “It’s only logical to see profit-taking in light of looming trade tensions and possible financial market turbulence,” said Eugen Weinberg, head of commodities research at Commerzbank AG in Frankfurt. Global equities sank after China unveiled its charges, which match the scale of proposed U.S. tariffs announced earlier this week and ratchets up tension in a brewing trade war between the world’s two largest economies. With products ranging from gas turbines to steel and aluminum affected, the spat threatens to raise costs, slow economic growth and hit oil demand. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Steadies After Selloff on Concerns of U.S.-China Trade Clash

Yuan-denominated oil futures on the Shanghai International Energy Exchange lost 2.8 percent to 405.5 yuan a barrel. The September delivery contract closed 0.9 percent lower on Monday after debuting last week. U.S. crude inventories are estimated to have added 2 million barrels last week, according to a Bloomberg survey before Energy Information Administration data due Wednesday. The nation’s oil production had also increased for a fifth week in the period ended March 23, hitting a fresh record. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Extends Rally After U.S. Rigs Decline as Iran Risks Persist

Crude rebounded over 5 percent last month, recouping February’s losses, after U.S. President Donald Trump named hawkish officials to his government, signaling the nation may pursue a more hard-line stance toward Iran. Even so, concerns persist that a rapid increase in American production, which has topped 10 million barrels a day each week since early February, could undermine efforts by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, which are trying to balance the market by cutting output. U.S. explorers cut the number of rigs by the most since November 2017 last week, bringing the total to 797, Baker Hughes data showed. Still, the count remains near the highest in three years, and with separate data showing nationwide crude inventories climbed 1.64 million barrels in the week ended March 23, jitters over increasing U.S. supplies remain. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Finishes the Week Up

Oil prices, starting with a decrease on Thursday morning, restored the growth by the end of the day and finishes the week, trading up. May Brent futures were 74 cents or 1.06% up, at $70.27 for a barrel at the end of London ICE Futures trading on March,29. June future contracts are 58 cents, or 0.84% up, at $69.34 per barrel. May WTI futures grew in price by 56 cents or 0.87%, to $64.94 for a barrel on NYMEX.
Read More

Xdesign’s Promo-Driven Design for Sprigs & Spirits

The HOW Promotion & Marketing Design Awards, which is HOW’s longest-running competition, has seen thousands and thousands of outstanding promo-driven design projects over the years. One such winning project—one that informed, persuaded and filled a need with flying colors—is Baton Rouge-based design firm Xdesign Inc.‘s work for Capitol City Produce. The project—a campaign for a cocktail creation contest created as a way for the client to showcase their products—was spearheaded by Xdesign Inc. art director Tiffanie Pitre and her team, which includes graphic designer Simone Begneaud, illustrator Vitalija Svencionyte, and copywriter Paige Fenerty.
Read More

Oil to Rise in 2018 as Opec Wages Tug-Of-War with U.S. Shale: Reuters Poll

Oil prices are likely to rise this year thanks to supply disruptions and an OPEC-led deal to limit production, but doubts over the future of compliance with the multilateral agreement and rising U.S. production could stem the upward momentum, a Reuters poll showed on Thursday. A survey of 31 economists and analysts polled by Reuters showed Brent crude LCOc1 would average nearly $64 a barrel in 2018, versus $63 forecast in the February survey, but below the $67.18 average for the benchmark so far in 2018.
Read More

Highest Honors: 2018 Top Graphic Design Schools

In the January/February 2018 magazine, which kicked off our 55th year of publishing, GDUSA released its annual Students To Watch roundup. In addition, we’ve compiled a list of our favorite institutions which prepare students to work in professional graphic design, based on a mix of objective and subjective factors, including our own decades-long relationships with designers, students, educators, recruiters.
Read More

Oil Retreats from 2018 Highs Above $70 a Barrel

Oil fell on Wednesday as investors took profit on a rally the day before to this year’s highs after a report showed a surprisingly large increase in U.S. crude inventories. June Brent crude futures LCOc2 were last down 27 cents on the day at $69.19 barrel by 1135 GMT, while the May contract LCOc1, which expires on Thursday, was down 16 cents at $69.95. WTI futures CLc1 fell 40 cents to $64.85 a barrel.
Read More

Enter GDUSA’s 2018 American Inhouse Design Awards

GDUSA’s American Inhouse Design Awards™ is the premier showcase for outstanding work by in-house designers. It is a unique opportunity for in-house designers at corporations, non-profits, institutions, universities, government, associations, media companies and other organizations with an in-house designer or team to be recognized by managers, colleagues and the community for their creativity, for the special challenges they face, and for the full value they bring to the table.
Read More

Oil Holds Above $70 as Geopolitics Eclipses Supply Outlook

Oil rose on Tuesday, holding above $70 a barrel for a third day, supported by concerns that tensions in the Middle East could lead to supply disruptions, although with global output rising fast, investors remained cautious. Brent crude futures LCOc1 were up 28 cents on the day at$70.40 a barrel by 0848 GMT, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures CLc1 were up 19 cents at $65.74 a barrel. The oil price has risen by more than 7 percent so far this month and by 5.3 percent in the first three months of the year, putting it on track for a third consecutive quarterly gain, something the market has not witnessed since late 2010.
Read More

Revolutionary Laser Die-Cutter Gives Designers Superhuman Powers

At Impress Communications the Highcon Laser Die-Cutter Opens Up a World of Possibilities The Highcon Laser Die-Cutter is a marvel of technology and engineering that represents a complete shift and new era for the design industry. This machine gives designers the power to envision and create artwork in ways that were previously impossible. The precision and flexibility of cutting with lasers, as opposed to the traditional method of using bent lengths of steel rule, removes the previous limitations associated with regular die-cutting. Now, a designer can strip away intricate sections of paper, leaving dramatic reveals of the substrate or product beneath. These kinds of paper layering techniques create a compelling impression with a brand’s end user, and allow creatives to reimagine what can be done with belly bands and sleeves, folding cards or french fold panels, and any kind of package that features a window.
Read More

How Publishers Should Tailor Their Marketing to Generational Preferences

I was recently at the Ricoh Marketing Innovator Symposium in Boulder, Colo., which attracted a range of attendees from the print, brand and agency worlds. One of the key takeaways from the event centered around the generational divide — different age demographics don’t just want different messages, they want different messaging platforms and different forms of communication altogether. The reality is that age does matter and using the wrong platform with the wrong demographic will ultimately hurt a publisher’s ability to effectively reach — and market to — those individuals.
Read More

Oil Prices Find Support in Trade Talks and Mideast Tensions

Crude oil futures steadied on Monday, supported by a rebound in stock markets and escalating Saudi-Iran tensions. Global stocks came off six-week lows on optimism that the United States and China are set to begin trade talks, easing fears about a trade war between the world’s two largest economies. The possibility of a full-blown trade war had weighed on the energy complex on fears that it could harm oil demand. Brent crude futures LCOc1 were up 9 cents at $70.54 a barrel at 1206 GMT. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures CLc1 eased 5 cents to $65.83.
Read More

Should You Price Hourly?

So many designers hate talking about money, especially with their clients and prospects, which makes pricing one of the most dreaded aspects of being self-employed. I think that’s why so many designers resign themselves to pricing their services by the hour, and that is truly a tragedy. I get it. Pricing hourly is easy. All you have to do is track your time, multiply and submit an invoice.
Read More

The Real Reason Machines Won’t Take Over

You'll see the sentiment expressed in many of our AI Week articles, in other content at DMN, and even in AI-forward books like What To Do When Machines Do Everything. The human touch will still be needed. For marketing; for business in general. And that's correct. There's no doing without humans, not just for the immediate future, but possibly not at all. It's easy to agree with that, but in fact there's a very specific reason machines can't do what humans can do, and it's worth exploring what it is.
Read More

Oil Buoyed by Saudi Talk of Extending Output Cuts into 2019

Oil prices rose on Friday after the Saudi energy minister said OPEC would need to keep coordinating supply cuts with non-member countries including Russia into 2019. Oil’s rise defied a slump in global stock markets, which fell in response to worries about a trade stand-off between the United States and China. Gold XAU=, seen as a safe haven, hit a two-week high. Brent crude futures LCOc1 were at $69.10 per barrel at 1136 GMT, up 19 cents but off a session high of $70. For the week, Brent was up about 4.4 percent, its strongest showing since October. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures CLc1 were at $64.57 a barrel, up 27 cents but below a session high of $65.42. On the week, WTI was up about 3.6 percent.
Read More

Oil Trades Near $65 With U.S. Inventories Below 5-Year Average

Oil prices are approaching the highs of January, after a wider market rout spurred the worst February decline in half a decade. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies have concluded they will eradicate the oil surplus by September even as investors continue to weigh those comments against surging U.S. crude production. U.S. crude inventories fell by 2.62 million barrels last week, the Energy Information Administration said Wednesday. Analysts had forecast a gain of 3.25 million barrels, and only two of the 12 surveyed had expected a decline. America’s gasoline inventories also tumbled for a third week to the lowest level since late January, while distillate stockpiles contracted for a sixth straight week to the least since December. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Brent Hits Six-Week High as U.S.-Saudi Talks Raise Risk for Iran

Futures rose as much as 1.2 percent to a six-week high, after advancing 2.1 percent on Tuesday. Donald Trump hinted at withdrawal from a deal curbing Iran’s nuclear program as Saudi Arabia’s Mohammed Bin Salman began a U.S. visit. Such a decision would raise the risk of the OPEC member’s oil exports being curtailed by sanctions. The specter of conflict involving giant producers is jolting prices, which have traded in a tight range since February. With the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies concluding that the market will rebalance by the end of September, Citigroup Inc. predicts oil’s recent “sideways” move is unlikely to last. Still, investors will be wary of growth in U.S. supply, which has threatened to undermine OPEC’s efforts to eliminate a global glut. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Rises Toward $63 as OPEC Cuts Weighed Against U.S. Supplies

Futures in New York rose as much as 1.2 percent after dropping on Monday. While U.S. inventories are forecast to have added 3.4 million barrels last week, that would mark slower growth than the prior week. OPEC and its partners, which are cutting output to ease the global glut, still expect markets to balance by about the third quarter, according to people familiar with the matter. U.S. crude inventories are at their highest since December and probably grew again last week, according to a Bloomberg survey before government data due Wednesday. While supplies are set for a fourth weekly advance, the expected increase is smaller than the 5 million-barrel gain a week earlier. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil prices ease, but Saudi-Iran tensions keep a floor in market

Oil prices slipped Monday, giving back some of a steep climb from Friday seen after Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said the kingdom would develop nuclear weapons if arch-rival Iran did. Underpinning prices are tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran, which are seen potentially disrupting global supplies. The Saudi crown prince visits the U.S. this week, which could provide plenty of headlines, as the Trump administration has called for a new look at the Iran nuclear pact. Trump told European leaders they must “fix the terrible flaws” in the deal or the U.S. would refuse to extend its sanctions relief on Iran. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Holds Near $61 as Shale Growth Balanced by IEA Supply View

Oil has been trading in a tight range this month, with prices hovering around $60 a barrel as rising U.S. output continues to stoke fears that a shale boom will limit price increases. Still, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and allied producers are continuing production cuts in an effort to drain a global glut and help prop up prices. A robust global economy has also led banks including Goldman Sachs Group Inc. to project strong demand for oil this year. The IEA raised its estimate for global oil demand growth by 90,000 barrels a day to 1.5 million a day in 2018 as a stronger outlook for developed economies offsets weakening expectations for emerging nations. Steady growth was also reflected in the American Petroleum Institute’s latest report showing U.S. oil consumption rose to the highest in 11 years even as crude production hit a new monthly record. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Saudi Arabia to keep April crude oil exports under 7 million bpd: ministry

Saudi Arabia plans to keep its crude oil production in April below 10 million barrels per day (bpd), and maintain exports under 7 million bpd, the energy ministry said on Wednesday, as the top OPEC producer wants to end a global supply glut and boost prices. Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest oil exporter, has been pumping below its OPEC target since January and reducing its crude shipments, particularly to the United States, as it turns its focus on cutting exports in an attempt to drain global oil stocks. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Halts Decline as Tillerson’s Departure Boosts Iran Risks

Futures rose 0.5 percent in New York. Prices seesawed on Tuesday after President Donald Trump fired Tillerson, whom he had disagreements with over key foreign policy issues. The move could have implications for U.S. sanctions on Iran, which could impact the latter’s oil industry and exports, Facts Global Energy and Royal Bank of Canada warned. “The risk is now much higher that President Trump will not waive the sanctions when it is time to do so in May, thus derailing the deal,” said Bjarne Schieldrop, chief commodities analyst at SEB AB. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Fluctuates Amid Concern American Supplies Will Exceed Demand

Oil has struggled to recover losses from last month’s broader market slump after topping $66 a barrel in January. While a brighter economic outlook has underpinned demand expectations following a better-than-expected U.S. jobs report, expanding American production remains a challenge to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, which are trying to prop up prices via output curbs. Production from shale regions will reach 6.95 million barrels a day next month, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said in its monthly drilling report. The Permian Basin is seen leading the way with an 80,000-barrel increase. Total American output has passed 10 million barrels a day, beating a record set in 1970. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Steadies Near $62 After Rallying on U.S. Employment Data

The U.S. jobs report topped estimates last week, increasing confidence in the world’s biggest economy, giving a boost to the outlook for energy demand and driving benchmark crude prices up 3.2 percent on Friday. American oil explorers idled four rigs last week after six consecutive increases in drilling, easing fears over surging shale production. Prices were 0.4 percent lower Monday. “Employment is the key driver of oil demand, as more people at work means more commutes and, in consequence, rising road fuel use,” said Norbert Ruecker, head of commodity research at Julius Baer Ltd. in Zurich. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Crude Tumbles as Rising Supply Counters Bullish Demand Outlook

Futures in New York tumbled 1.7 percent Thursday. While Goldman Sachs Group Inc. forecasted strong global consumption growth, crude production and stockpiles in the U.S. climbed higher in the latest inventory report. A strengthening dollar also pushed crude lower. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its partners including Russia continue to trim output as promised. OPEC shipments will fall by 230,000 barrels a day in the four weeks to March 24, according to tanker-tracker Oil Movements. Saudi Minister of Energy and Industry Khalid Al-Falih said in a Bloomberg Television interview that the deal will evolve in 2019 and the group will do what it needs to in order to preserve oil market stability. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Sun Chemical Acquires PPG’s Metal Deco Ink Business

Sun Chemical has acquired the Metal Deco ink business of PPG, a US-based global supplier of paints, coatings and specialty materials. PPG, with a well consolidated portfolio, and Sun Chemical are both long standing players in the metal packaging industry. Through the acquisition, which reflects Sun Chemical’s strategy to grow by acquiring businesses that complement areas of its existing operations, Sun Chemical will expand both its operational territories and its overall position in the global Metal Deco market. By combining PPG’s complementary portfolio of Metal Deco products with those of Sun Chemical, customers will benefit from further innovative solutions and what will be the widest ink portfolio in the metal decoration market. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Drops Most in Three Weeks Amid Falling Equities, Output Jump

Futures in New York slid 2.3 percent. Declines in the equity market, a rising dollar and concern that Trump’s tariff threats will spark a trade war acted as a downward force on crude oil. And at the same time, the Energy Information Administration reported American crude inventories rose by 2.41 million barrels last week, while production jumped to a fresh record. The EIA report also showed gasoline supplies declined for the first time since January and distillate inventories fell for a fourth straight week. Stockpiles at the key U.S. storage hub in Cushing, Oklahoma tumbled for an 11th week to the lowest since 2014. Crude inventories rose by 2.41 million barrels, lower than expectations. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Rises a Second Day as Equity Gains Offset Supply Concerns

After jumping 2.2 percent on Monday, futures added 1 percent in New York on Tuesday. European and Asian stocks rose as President Donald Trump faced resistance to plans for a series of import tariffs, while a diplomatic breakthrough with North Korea also boosted optimism. Still, the International Energy Agency’s warning that OPEC production cuts will unleash a supply surge from the U.S. and other producers maintained a note of caution in the market. The production cuts that helped push prices above $60 a barrel are triggering a flood of supply from OPEC’s rivals including Brazil and Canada, which will cover all growth in global demand until 2020, the IEA said. The agency may also raise its forecast for U.S. output if oil stays above $60 a barrel, Birol said during the CERAWeek oil conference in Houston. Non-OPEC growth is so strong that the oil market will change for years, he said. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More

Oil Steadies as Libya Restarts Biggest Oil Field After Stoppage

Futures in New York rose 0.2 percent after a 3.6 percent decline last week. The Sharara field, Libya’s biggest, has started producing again after stopping on Sunday following a closure of the pipeline carrying oil to the Zawiya refinery, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. The halt came shortly after protests disrupted output at another Libyan deposit in February. Libyan production had been surging in recent months, becoming a thorn for the market on concern that further growth could test the country’s pledge to curb production as part of OPEC’s plan to limit a global oversupply. The increase, together with warnings of rising U.S. output from organizations including the the International Energy Agency, has prevented prices from regaining the highs of January even as most OPEC members continue to cut supply. Click Read More below for additional information.
Read More
Back To Top
×Close search
Search